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Corn, is a large grain plant first domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mexico about 10,000 years ago. Over time is became one of the most versatile food staples throughout history. Originally maize, it became known as corn which could be consumed in any number of ways; roasted, baked, fried, boiled, ground into meal for any number of uses. We are celebrating corn in its many forms in this listing of recipes that will help you appreciate the most appealing and tasty dishes easily prepared at home.

Marjorie’s Corn and Peas
Corn and Peas Side DishThis is another amazingly good recipe from the Thistlethwaite family. I fondly remember a number of delicious Thanksgiving dinners when Marjorie (J.B.’s mother) would bring this delicious vegetable dish. Combining shoe-peg corn and frozen peas with sour cream and spices, it goes together quickly, and certainly stands out on the table. The recipe is located here.

Texas Style Creamed Corn
Texas Style Creamed Corn with BaconThis corn is so delicious with barbecued ribs or brisket! Most of Texas’s best barbecue restaurants serve this style corn with coleslaw, potato salad and baked beans. Add bread, pickles, onions, and hot sauce, and you have a feast! You can even add in some bacon crumbles as shown above. The recipe is located here.

Texican Street Corn
Texican Street CornThis is a delicious ear of corn! Cooking in the microwave retains all the flavor and sweetness other methods often cook out, and clean up is so easy; no shucking, no frustration trying to remove the silks. We like them without any cheese just as well, although you can take this in many flavorful directions by using your favorite cheese.The recipe is located here.

Creamy Creamed Corn
Creamed CornThis recipe comes as close as possible to the flavor of the creamed corn at one of our favorite BBQ joints in Central Texas. Combining heavy cream, cream cheese, butter, sugar, salt and pepper in a slow cooker, it is a delicious blend of flavors that goes very well with every barbecue dish. Get the recipe here.
For a spicy version see Poblano Creamed Corn.

Campfire Chicken Dinner with Roasted Corn
Roasted Chicken Dinner in FoilWhat a fun recipe this is! A chicken quarter, or breast, potatoes, carrots and roasting ears, all in a single foil pack. Can actually be cooked on the campfire, or roasted in the oven, for the fun of an “outdoor” meal with all the flavors and variety of a home meal. This can be served right in the foil for easy after-meal cleanup!
The recipe is located here.

Poblano Creamed Corn
Poblano Creamed CornThis recipe is based on a favorite side dish we enjoy at a barbecue restaurant in Bee Cave, Texas, near Austin. I actually based the sauce in this dish on Southern creamed corn slow-cooker style recipes, and added the roasted Poblano chili for that unctuous earthy flavor. This requires special attention, and quite a bit of stirring, to successfully obtain that slow-cooker intense flavor. This is delicious with any barbecue flavored dish. The recipe is located here.

Cornbread Casserole
Cornbread CasseroleThis is an oldie, but goodie! This is so simple, and goes well with lots of homemade meals! The recipe doubles easily, too, for bigger gatherings! Combine whole kernel corn, cream-style corn, and sour cream with a store-bought cornbread mix. A quick and easy favorite, it takes only 5 minutes to prepare, and even the kids love it! The recipe is located here.

Golden Sweet Cornbread
Golden Sweet Skillet CornbreadSkillet cornbread, historically known as hoecakes, is cornbread made like a pancake. Inside, it’s dense, but creamy. Skillet cornbread takes it up a notch or two with even texture, and sweetness throughout. This is an American classic that pays homage to our pioneer ancestors. The recipe is located here.

Celebrate corn! And, share with us your comments, thoughts, and favorite recipes, to be shared with others. Best regards from our kitchen to yours!

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Pitch-in dinners are a fun way to share togetherness and fellowship with friends and family, and you can kick up the fun factor by making it a themed pitch-in. Make it an “Appetizers Only” party, Munchies Only, with dips and things to dip into them, “Some like it HOT,” featuring spicy dishes, Hot Casseroles Only, Cold Salads Only, or, “How Sweet it is!” desserts only. Here are some dishes, with links to our recipes, that you can pass along as ideas.

Appetizers Only
Sweet Swedish Meatballs
Cheese and Sweet Pickles
Breaded Mushrooms
Honey Roasted Cipollini Onions

Munchies Only
Rye Bread with Dill Dip
Herb Oil Fried Zuchinni with Ranch Dip
Spinach Artichoke Dip
Stuffed Baby Portobello Mushrooms

“Some like it HOT”
Campfire Chili
Gene Vaughn’s 2-Alarm Chili
Jamaican Jerk Chicken
Peppercorn Encrusted Roast Chicken

Hot Casseroles Only
Creamy Four Cheese Macaroni
Orange & Gold Potatoes au Gratin
Sour Cream and Horseradish Mashed Potatoes
Baked Macaroni and Cheese

Cold Salads Only
Grapefruit and Fennel Salad
Sweet and Sour Yellow Beets
Cauliflower and Broccoli Salad
Green and Gold Pea Salad

How Sweet it is! desserts
Peach Cobbler
Butternut Cream Pie
Gooey Butter Cake
Pear Bread Pudding with Butterscotch Sauce

Have fun with your pitch-in dinners! Select a theme and see how much more fun the party is when you elevate it to a whole new level. And, be sure to let us know how your idea worked out!

No one wants to take “just-another-same-same” dish to the pitch in dinner with friends or family. What we want is a dish with lots of visual appeal. Whether it comes from color or texture, we want everyone who passes by our dish to notice it. Here are a few of our favorites.

Sauteed Green Beans with Onions and Bacon
Green Beans with Onions and BaconHere is a green bean dish that certainly stands out from the others, particularly because most green beans turn gray from being overcooked. Boil these for four minutes and then immediately get into a cold water bath to stop the cooking and keep the beans bright green. Add crispy bacon and sauteed cocktail onions, and you have a winner! Get the recipe here.

Whole Sweet Corn with Cream Cheese
creamy-creamed-cornThis recipe comes as close as possible to the flavor of the creamed corn at one of our favorite BBQ joints in Central Texas. Combining heavy cream, cream cheese, butter, sugar, salt and pepper in a slow cooker, it is a delicious blend of flavors that goes very well with every barbecue dish. Get the recipe here.
For a spicy version see Poblano Creamed Corn.

Blue Cheese Cole Slaw
Blue Cheese Cole SlawLea adapted this recipe from a cooking show on television. This combination goes really well with spicy foods such as Southern Fried Chicken, Hot Chicken Wings, Spicy Jamaican Jerk Rib-eye Steaks, etc. It is also a real eye-catcher when completing with all the other dishes at a pitch-in. Get the recipe here.

Make Ahead Mashed Potatoes
Make Ahead Mashed PotatoesMashed potatoes are always a welcome staple, but they are pretty time consuming, and difficult to time just right if you have to travel to that pitch-in. These potatoes come out of the oven light and fluffy, and no one will know that these were made ahead of time. It’s a great time saver. Get the recipe here.

Marjorie’s Corn and Peas
Corn and Peas Side DishThis is another amazingly good recipe from the Thistlethwaite family. I fondly remember a number of delicious Thanksgiving dinners when Marjorie (J.B.’s mother) would bring this delicious vegetable dish. Combining shoe-peg corn and frozen peas with sour cream and spices, it goes together quickly, and certainly stands out on the table. Get the recipe here.

These dishes not only show off your cooking skills, they also stand apart from the other dishes for your pitch in dinner with friends or family. When you present one of these super star dishes, everyone who passes by is sure to notice it, and the flavors always deliver on the promise.

Pitch-in (or, Carry-in) dinners are fun! We always enjoy getting together with friends and family, and when we can do it over food, that’s an even better good time! One of the reasons we enjoy those dinners so much is because of the variety of dishes that we find on the table(s). We might get a chance to try two or three versions of the same dish, and wonder at the variety of flavors that were mixed up. Here are a few of our recipes that offer up a little, sometimes whimsical, fun in being just a bit different than the regular dishes.

Rye Bread with Dill Dip
Dill Dip in Rye Bread LoafOur extended family started serving this treat several years ago. Marjorie, Larry’s mother, got the dill dip recipe from a grocery store that made this fresh daily, and was one of their best selling products. We have served it many times over the last thirty years, and it is one of our family’s favorites. Hollow out the middle, fill it with dip, and break up the center you removed and place around the loaf. Find the recipe here.

Roasted Cheddar Potato Fans
Roasted cheddar potato fanOne dish we don’t often see at a carry-in dinner is baked potatoes due to the difficulty of transporting them safely. Here’s an innovative way to bring a stand-out dish that isn’t likely to be duplicated. These can be made from quite small potatoes, right down to fingerlings or bite-size Russets. Have fun with this one, and soak in the oohhs and aahhs when you put them out. Find the recipe here.

Spinach Artichoke Dip
Spinach Artichoke DeipThis is a silky textured dip that pairs perfectly with tortilla chips. I like to finish mine with a slice of mozzarella cheese and a little dried parsley before baking. I like to finish it with a little bit of browned cheese on top, just to add an additional dimension of flavor and color. Your fellow diners will appreciate the eye appeal of the cheese, and the additional hint of flavor from the parsley. This is going to be a hit! Here is the recipe.

Seasoned Olive Oil for Bread Dipping
Seasoned Olive Oil with Balsamic ReductionThis is a fun dish that folks return to time and again. Fill up a large dinner plate or platter with this dipping oil, season it up with any combination of flavors you prefer along with cubes of three or four types of bread, and you’ll have them coming back for thirds and fourths. Our favorite breads to dip include; ciabatta, baguettes, French loaf, focaccia bread, Italian bread, and bread sticks. Have fun with this one! Find our recipe here.

Green and Gold (Pea) Salad
Green and Gold Pea SaladThis is a recipe that Lea has used since her Junior High School days. She made this in her Home Economics class when she was in the seventh grade. It’s a fun dish, easy to put together, and always brings “yums” when it is uncovered at carry-ins. Silky smooth and earthy in flavor, this is sure to become a favorite with your family. The recipe is here.

And, just for fun: Purple Pickled Eggs
pix-2008-purple-pickled-eggsOur family really loves these pickled eggs, and we used to make up a batch of them each year at Christmas time when our far-flung family got to be together at our bed and breakfast, the Asher Walton House! We printed up funny labels for the eggs, and that always adds to the fun. Boiled eggs and beets get evenly mixed, in a glass container, with sweet-sour mixture, horseradish and cloves to deliver great flavor and a bright purple color. This dish always strikes up a lot of conversation. Enjoy! Here’s the recipe.

Every day, home cooks hear, “what’s for dinner?” as hungry family members sneak a peek into bubbling pots and sizzling pans with anticipation. And, while there’s definitely a place for multi-hour braises and slow-simmered sauces, sometimes you just need a satisfying meal on the table. From quick and easy to classic and developed, nothing seems to shed the cold and warm the soul like a hardy, earthy, soup or stew. Here are a few favorite recipes that create that back-home feeling.

Sausage and Spinach Garbanzo Bean Soup
Sausage and Spinach Garbanzo Bean SoupSweet Italian sausage and chopped spinach combine to give this fall soup the soul-warming hardiness we love in our comfort food. This is a tasty and hardy soup for those days you need to take a little chill off the bones, and is also ideal for a quick meal when pressed for time. This is best when served right away while the spinach still has some crunch.
Get the recipe here.

Campfire Chili (Mild)
Campfire chili adapted for home cookingThis is a very flavorful, but mild heat, beef chili that was developed during family campouts, keeping youngsters’ pallets in mind. Take it in what ever direction you like by selecting some of your favorite sides or seasonings. Get the recipe here.

Spicy Sausage and Navy Bean Soup
Spicy Sausage and Navy Bean SoupThis is a perfect soup for those chilly days of fall and winter, with Hot Italian Sausage, Fire Roasted tomatoes, and fresh kale. This is a quick and easy recipe, but if you want to cook it longer to blend the flavors, leave the kale out until just before you are going to serve. The kale is best when it has just a little bite to it.
Get the recipe here.

Gene Vaughn’s 2-Alarm Chili
Gene Vaughn's Chili in Black PotThis recipe was one of my dad’s favorites. It was adapted, enhanced and embellished from the Army’s 1944 Cook’s Manual for Chili Con Carne. Dad’s recipe doesn’t much resemble that one, but is the result of much trial and error. This chili carries a lot of spicy flavors, mellowed by chocolate.
Get the recipe here.

French Onion Soup
Sweet Onion SoupThis classic soup delivers the wonderful aromas of caramelized onions, apple and a bouquet garni. Large sweet onions caramelize in butter that browns itself during cooking, and get a boost in flavor with apple juice or cider. Finish under the grill for that eye-pleasing presentation that is a classic favorite.
Get the recipe here.

White Bean and Pork Chili
White Bean and Pork ChiliAnother chili, but this one is made with pork, and gets mild spice from a Poblano chili. The velvety texture is surprisingly luscious, and is derived from the last minute addition of shredded Monterey Jack cheese. Keep your sausage in bite-size chunks for the “meatiness” texture we favor in chili soups of all kinds. Get the recipe here.

Spoon Dumplings for Soup
Spoon Dumplings in StewAdd another layer of flavor and comfort to any soup or stew by adding simple spoon dumplings just like great-grandma used to make. This recipe was handed down by Lea’s grandmother to her mother, Pauline Tate. Lea has used this recipe since she was a child cooking at home with her family. These dumplings really stand out on top of soup beans, vegetable soup and even chili! Get the recipe here.

Salads add eye appeal to a table setting, and contribute delightful flavors to complement the main course and other side dishes. Delicious salads may include fruit salads, chicken, egg and potato salads, as well as the ever-popular, leafy, mixed greens salads. Today we are listing some of our favorite salads that can be eaten before the meal, or as a side dish to accompany the protein served during the main course.

Cauliflower and Broccoli Salad
Cauliflower and Broccoli SaladCombine cauliflower, broccoli, onion, bell pepper, and pimento with a creamy sweet and sour dressing to make a colorful salad for holiday meals. This salad is delicious any time of the year, but, it is a favorite in our family since Marjorie Vaughn (Larry’s mom) first made it salad in 1973 for our family Christmas dinner. Find the recipe here.

Cheesy Pear Salad

Cheesy Pear SaladThis is a pretty salad when served assembled, and really catches the eye due to the contrasting colors. The flavor is delicate, with just a hint of sourness from the French dressing, which complements the pear and cheddar flavors perfectly. Give this one a try. It will quickly become a favorite at your house, too. Find the recipe here.

Chicken and Fruit Salad
Chicken and Fruit SaladLea created this recipe during the heat of August 1966 for a radio station “no cook” recipe contest. The judges voted it number one! It is a surprisingly delicious twist on everyday chicken salad that delivers a variety of fresh fruit flavors and the crunchiness of pecans and celery in a shredded or chunked chicken. Oranges, grapes, a banana, and an apple make an appearance along with salted almonds.
Find the recipe here.

Cranberry Salad
Lea Mixing Cranberry SaladLarry’s mother, Marjorie, always made this for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. It is so delicious with turkey! We enjoy it mostly with the turkey sandwiches the day after the holiday! Give cranberries a ride in the food processor, add sugar and orange, marshmallows and nuts to create a chilled salad that is even better the day after. Find the recipe here.

Iceberg Wedge Salad
wedge-salad_rThis elegant wedge salad with crumbled blue cheese is a steakhouse staple great for a simple lunch, or dressed up for a special occasion dinner. Fresh ingredients make this salad very elegant, and the wedge presentation makes it an eye-pleaser. Here are three versions: the classic, with blue cheese, another with red pepper aioli, and a third with cheddar cheese. Find the recipes here.

Seven Layer Salad
Seven Layer SaladWhen you talk about eye-pleasing salads, the Seven Layer Salad immediately comes to mind. With its striking layers of color from lettuce, cauliflower, green peas, cheddar cheese, and topped with onion rings, sliced boiled eggs and crumbled bacon, this salad promises great flavors, and delivers on the promise every time. Find the recipe here.

Green and Gold Pea Salad
Green and Gold Pea SaladA colorful salad that delivers on savory flavors, this salad combines cooked peas with American cheese and spices to create a creamy dish with the subtle pop of mustard in the background. This recipe dates back to Lea’s Junior High School days and has been a long time family favorite. This is one of those dishes that tastes even better the next day, and often appears on leftovers plates as a side. Find the recipe here.

Mozzarella and Tomato Salad with Black Olive Tapenade
Tomato and Mozzarella Salad with Black Olive TapenadeA bright and appealing salad that is a summertime favorite gets all dressed up for the holiday season with luscious sliced mozzarella, bright red tomatoes, and fresh basil leaves, topped with a black olive tapenade.
Find the recipe here.

We love a tender, juicy, well-cooked beef steak. It can elevate a meal to an entirely higher level. Steaks are, perhaps, most often grilled in an attempt to replicate the flavor of steak cooked over the glowing coals of a campfire. But, steak can also be pan-seared, roasted, broiled, cubed for stew, and even ground to make steak-burgers. When you prepare a good quality slab of steak, you want to have some insight in how to prepare, season, cook, and it. mess it up with complicated cooking techniques. Serving a perfectly prepared steak is very satisfying, and there is no reason it has to be overly difficult. The notes below can help you avoid common mistakes like an ugly gray exterior or over-cooked, dry, interior.

Chart of Beef Cuts

Premium Meats for Primo Meals

Steak isn’t just a cut of beef, it is the best of the best. Steaks come from the top of the steer, generally along the backbone, where there isn’t much muscle or connective tissue, which is why this meat is much more tender and faster cooking. Intense heat is all that’s needed to char and brown the outside, while the inside can be eaten as rare as you like. These much sought after premium cuts are only a small piece of the animal, which contributes to their premium prices. Since they are expensive, it’s worth knowing how to prepare each cut, and what to expect from the finished product.

1. Filet Mignon (aka Tenderloin, or Châteaubriand)

Filet Mignon Steak, uncookedThis is the tenderest of all the steaks. This is also the most expensive steak because there just isn’t much of it per animal. It comes from the short loin and sirloin, right under the ribs. A whole tenderloin starts out wide (the “head”) and then tapers down to the other end (the “tail”). Filet Mignon is from the tail end, and Châteaubriand comes from the head. When trimmed properly, the tenderloin is small, lean, fine-grained, and usually cut thicker than most steaks due to its smaller size. Lean tenderloin is buttery and mild in flavor. The best way to cook it is pan roasting.

2. New York Strip (aka Manhattan, Kansas City strip, top sirloin, top loin)

top-sirloin-steak_rawUsually boneless, this steak comes from the short loin behind the ribs. It has fat on one edge of the steak, with some fat marbling, but no large pockets of fat. New York strips are tender, with medium fat content, but not as tender as tenderloins or rib eyes. Their big beefy flavor is brought out by cooking over high heat; pan-seared, broiled, or grilled.

3. T-Bone (aka Porterhouse)

T-Bone Steak, uncookedSold bone in, the tenderloin portion must be 1.25″ wide to be classified as a porterhouse and only .5″ wide to be classified as a T-bone. You get the best of both worlds with this steak; super-tender, buttery tenderloin, and beefy, juicy sirloin (strip) steak on either side of the longer portion of the T-bone. Because there are basically two different kinds of steak, you have to be careful, because the tenderloin will cook more quickly than the sirloin side. Try to keep the tenderloin further away from the heat source, or use a two-level fire to grill.

4. Bone-In Rib Eye (aka Delmonico, Scotch fillet, Spencer, Market Steak)

Rib Eye Steak, uncookedRib-eyes are basically a prime rib or standing rib roast cut down into individual steaks. Taken from the upper rib cage, it has webs of fat marbling throughout the meat, and pockets of fat interspersed throughout. There is finer grain at the center while the outer section is looser and fattier. It tastes super beefy, juicy, and flavorful. Cook over high heat. It will hold up very well to pan searing, broiling, roasting, or grilling, although with the high fat content, you need to be careful about drippings into the fire.

These are the most popular cuts of steak, though not a complete list of cuts available. For other tips on how to prepare and cook steak, visit our How to Cook Steak page. Your butcher can help you select additional cuts of meat to try, too. Their insights can introduce you to newer, less popular cuts of meat that boast huge flavor. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about how to cook your new selection, because they like to share their knowledge.

Ready to make some magic happen? Try these great steak recipes:

Pan-Roasted Rib Eye Steak
Malted Pepper Steak
Browned Steak Strips with Pan Gravy
Jamaican Jerk Beef-Tenderloin Steaks
Grilled Rib-Eye Steak
Horseradish & Black Pepper Crusted Rib Eye

Harvesting apples in the fall is such a rewarding undertaking! We, and our friends and extended families, always looked forward to the apple harvesting season. We would drive out to one or more of the local orchards where we could gather all we wanted of the various varieties of apples. Apple Cider PressWe like to press a blend of apples to make apple cider, applesauce, and apple butter, each of which requires a crafty blending of a variety of types of apples. We also would make up a couple dozen pie shells using Lea’s pie dough recipe. We then peeled and sliced apples, arranged some in pie shells, others in freezer bags, seasoned them up, and wrapped them tightly for storage in the freezer for later use.

Sliced Johnathan and Granny Smith ApplesApples are such a versatile fruit they can be used as stand alone snacks, of course, and also used to make sauces, glazes, side dishes and desserts. They are canned, pressed to produce apple juice, baked, fried, sauteed, braised, and all the other techniques. Raw or cooked, apples are glorious. We have a few favorite apple items that come to mind when the cooler weather arrives.

Cinnamon Apple Tortilla Roll Ups, Apple Stuffed Pork Chops, Apple-Ginger Thick Cut Pork Chops, Apple Dump Cake,Apple Pie with Rum Raisin Sauce and one last mention of the slice of hot apple pie with Rum Raisin Sauce. If you don’t care for the rum, here’s a version of Raisin Sauce you might like better.

For all of these reasons, we are real fans of the glorious apple. Oh, and if you’ve never tried it, one of the great variations on apple pie is melting a slice of cheddar cheese on top and then drizzling with a cinnamon sauce. I first ran across this delectable treat decades ago when I was an announcer at a local radio station, and the pharmacy across the street still had a lunch counter where they served their apple pie with this topping. Here’s a snapshot4 Year old lattices a pie from the scrapbook: our 4-year old grandson putting the lattice on a treat just before going into the oven. It’s as easy as apple pie!

Black Pot with Coals on LidThe cooler weather brought by the fall season brings fond memories of camp outs, bonfires, black pots, apple and pumpkin pies, and hearty chili soup to warm the soul. Raised in the Midwest, we experienced the colors and weather of all four seasons, including the final harvest of the season, the jovial hayrides behind a farm tractor or hay truck, vast pumpkin patches, and the growing excitement of the approaching holiday season.

:ea's Pumpkin PieWhen I think of pumpkins, the aroma and flavors of the seeds of a pumpkin we had just harvested toasting in the oven come to mind. Lea is held in high regard for her outstanding pie crust and her scrumptious apple and pumpkin pies. These are favorites, and often requested, at our church.

Gene Vaughn's Chili in Black PotChili soup brings back memories of my dad’s continuing development of his chili recipe, and how he was always experimenting with it. In particular, I remember him trying to include lettuce in it (Don’t try this at home, kids), and his one attempt at using chocolate candy bars as an ingredient (not successful! Candy makers will tell you that paraffin wax is a common ingredient in chocolate.) Nevertheless, over the years he developed a recipe that was popular with the local National Guard unit he served in. His recipe is named Gene Vaughn’s 2-Alarm Chili.

Coney Island Style Chili Cheese Hot DogI, on the other hand, have a couple versions of chili soup that are really popular with our church family, Chipotle Chili Soup (Medium Heat), and the Campfire Chili I have made since back when I was a boy on overnight camp outs. If you don’t have a lot of time to spend nurturing a chili to perfection, you can always fall back on our 30-Minute Chili Sauce that works just as well in a bowl as it does seasoned up over spaghetti, or spread on a chili cheese hot dog.

Do you have a favorite fall recipe? Drop us a line, or a link, and let us know. We would be happy to share it here on our cookbook. We are really looking forward to some great fall and winter time dishes!

Pat's Spicey Saltine CrackersIn the sweltering summer of 2016, Lea and I drove from our home in Central Texas to our childhood hometown to attend her family’s annual reunion at the “Homeplace” in rural northeast Missouri. The Homeplace is a 3-acre plot of land deep in the woods, miles from town, purchased by her great-grandfather, George Austin Tate, in 1891. Her grandfather was born in the cabin there, as was her own father. The property now belongs to her and her siblings.

Each summer we gather from all parts of the country for the weekend gathering, which is centered around catching up with each other’s activities, our children and their families, and of course, food. In fact, food is one of the primary topics of discussion, as many members in the family are cooks, and some grow big gardens and can the produce they grow. Everyone brings a dish or two for the main pitch-in lunch, and it is always a challenge to get everything crowded onto your plate.

This year we had quite a discussion around one of the snack treats Pat had made, spicy (some heat) saltine crackers. Spicy Oyster CrackersKathy, however, said she preferred to make them with Oyster crackers. And, the debate was on! Pat likes the saltines because you can hold them between your finger and thumb without getting messy spice all over your palm. Kat, on the other hand, (pun intended), likes the oyster crackers because you get more of the flavoring with each bite, which tends to hide the pasty flavor of the cracker.

Dill Oyster CrackersIf you’re interested in a version of the oyster crackers without any heat, check out Deb’s Dill Oyster Crackers. We served these when we ran a Bed and Breakfast, and they made an excellent snack for our guests. We served them both ways, baked and unbaked, and guests loved them both.
 
So, which do you like? Have you tried these, or a variation that you like? Send us your favorite recipes with comments, and we’ll post it here on the site.

Do you often wonder which spice goes with what, or how to choose those that combine well? Check out our spice page, which is helping cooks of all ages learn some of the basics.

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EZ Tortilla Soup
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Poblano Creamed Corn



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Spinach Artichoke Dip





Wonder About Spices?
Which to Use When?
What Goes With What?
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Food Prep Terms

Need to know when to Chop, Dice or Chiffonade? How about Stir, Blend, Fold, or Mix? What are the differences? Click here

Surviving God’s Woodshed

Read about the terrible ordeal Lea and Larry underwent in 2005 when Lea spent 78 days in a coma during 180 days of emergency treatment in Hartford Hospital. Read about her miraculous healing and eventual return to an active lifestyle. Click here.

Recipes for Large Groups

Looking for recipes for a large group? Lea and Larry cooked for 50-100 at church functions. Find their recipes here

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